Play-Smart Homepage

PLAY
Blanket Fort
Board Games
Bubbles
Buttons
Card Games
Cardboard Boxes
Catching Bugs
Chasing Lizards
Climbing Trees
Collections
The Creek
Dominoes
Flashlights
Follow the Leader
Gossip & Telephone
Hand Clapping Games
Hand Stacking Games
Hide & Seek
Hopscotch
Hotwheels
Jumping Rope
Light Switches
Lighting Matches
Marbles & Jacks
The Park
Peek-A-Boo
Playdough
Mud & Puddles
Playing Catch
Pointy Sticks
Pots & Pans
Riddles & Jokes
Sandbox
Simon Says
Singing Games
Stickers
String & Rope
Stick Fighting
Tea Party
Walking on the Curb

The Curb

Walking on the curb develops the mind and body. A professional intervention and assessment commonly used in physical therapy and occupational therapy is to balance carefully while walking with feet close together in a straight line on a rope. Walking on a curb provides nearly the same experience but in an exciting way that a rope on the floor can never quite match. Curbs are a minor nuisance for adults, hardly worth noticing, but for young children, the curb is still an exciting challenge to overcome. At first, they'll cling to your hand, and later just want you standing close by, and eventually they'll be completely on their own - what an exciting day! While you are taking time to smell the flowers, save time for the curb, too, as this is one of life's best small pleasures that is in danger of being lost.

LARGE MOTOR SKILLS
Balancing helps them do this and bringing feet together at midline of the body does that and jumping over does this other thing and it's all good.

DETERMINATION
It's almost surprising how hard walking the length of a curb can be for young children. They might fall off many times as they learn how to balance and stay on track. Eventually, they will do it, and what a wonderful feeling that is. You can learn a lot about how your child is going to cope with the world later by watching how they handle this task now - do they give up easily or keep at it? Do they cry and whine and moan at a hard task, or keep trying with a good attitude until they can make it? Do they "cheat" by putting a foot down and then saying "I did it!" anyway, even when they did not really make it across? Pay attention to your toddler now, to see what kind of teenager you will have later, and remember it's much easier to intervene and correct bad habits at two years old, before they are fully formed, than it will be to try to correct them later, when your child is older.

Suggested books about the Curb.
(Please click the picture for more info or to purchase.)

LEARN
Large Motor Skills
Fine Motor Skills
Self-Discipline
Patience & Waiting
Taking Turns
Following Directions
Cause & Effect
Memory & Memorization
Planning & Organization
Imagination & Creativity

Social Skills
Courtesy & Manners
Kindness & Empathy
Cooperation
Respect

Independence
Initiative
Courage
Resourcefulness
Determination
Solving Problems
Making Decisions

Reading
Writing
Speaking
Listening
Math
Money
Science
Social Studies
Music & Dance
Visual Arts

|   ABOUT   |    CONTACT   |    STORE   |    FRIENDS   |      IMAGES   |    PRIVACY   |